deaf strategies website

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Welcome to the

Deaf Strategies Website

 

What is this deaf strategies website about?

Deaf Strategies has been designed with hearing impaired people in mind. It brings together strategies that people with a hearing loss have found helpful to them in a variety of situations. We hope that people will be able to dip into this pot of ideas and take what they feel they will find useful, much like the bee in the photo below takes the nectar from the poppy.

Would you make a good lipreading teacher?

Scroll down for more information

 

How you can use this website

  bee on a poppy

1. Adapt the suggestions to your own needs.
2. Remember that what might work for one person might not work for another.
3. Ignore suggestions which don't appeal to you.
4. You might find it helpful to list the ideas you feel will help you in the order of your preference.
5. You can always try one course of action and if that fails try another.
6. Please try not to be downhearted if things don't work out straight away. Please try another strategy. Also, you might find it helpful to talk over the problem with someone else if you are having difficulty finding a solution as they might be able to offer further suggestions or listen to you whilst you develop your own solutions.
7. Several hearing impaired people said that they found that time is a great healer and that they eventually developed a sense of humour in some situations.

 

 

Where have the strategies on this site come from?

This site has been put together from tips and strategies collected by lipreading teachers and their classes. If you are interested in becoming a lipreading teacher you can find information on our course on our sister website: www.manchesterdeafstudies.org or you can email for information on enquiries@manchesterdeafstudies.org

 

The types of strategies you will find on this website:

Anticipatory and repairing strategies

The strategies on this website can be used to anticipate what problems might come up or to repair a situation that has gone wrong.

 

Anticipatory strategies

It can be helpful to think about what sorts of things might come up in a situation before you go into it. 

For example, when I go to my optician I have to take my glasses off. I have found that I can’t hear him and I can’t lipread him without my glasses on. A strategy that works for me is to explain this to my optician.  I then ask him to tell me give his instructions BEFORE I take my glasses off.

Another example: supermarket checkout staff tend to ask certain things such as: “Do you need help with your packing”, “Are you collecting the vouchers”, “Do you want cashback”, etc.  I find if I’m able to anticipate what might be said, it helps me to lipread them better.  Some people have found that practicing sentences that they think are likely to come up in front of a mirror helps them to learn the look of the phrase.

 

Repairing strategies

We can’t expect to be able to anticipate everything that everyone says to us and sometimes we need to try several repair tactics or strategies before we find one that works for us.

Other strategies are more about repairing a situation in which we are having difficulty following speech. For example, if the optician is trying to tell me what I need to do before I take my glasses off, but I can’t lipread him because he has a beard and moustache which cover his mouth – my strategy for this might be to ask him to write it down.

 

How we ask can make a difference

If we do need to ask someone to do something to help us, such as repeat something or move into a better light or write something down, how we ask can make a difference.  Many people said that they always ask politely or with a smile and find that most people are willing to help.

Naturally, if we ask in a more aggressive way because we are feeling frustrated or panicked then we might not get as much help or might even discourage people from helping.

 

Copying material from this website

People are welcome to print off sections for their own personal use; however if the material is to be passed on to someone else we would appreciate it if you cite this website as the source.

 

Disclaimer

The information on this website is given in good faith but the deafstrategies team cannot accept responsibility for any loss, damage or injury resulting from its use.

Links to other sites are provided for your convenience and does not mean that we endorse the material at those sites or any associated organisation, product or service.

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Would you make a good lipreading teacher?

Manchester Lipreading Teacher Training Course receives large grant

Thanks to this grant, Manchester Centre for Deaf Studies has been able to greatly reduce the cost of training to be a lipreading teacher.  As well as lower tuition fees, the grant will also provide interest free loans and bursaries.

Many deafened and hard of hearing people have found lipreading classes to be of great benefit.  Besides lipreading skills, lipreading classes can help people to develop other communication skills and tactics to use in difficult situations.

Lipreading classes can help people who use hearing aids and cochlear implants to gain more benefit from them.

Lipreading teachers can provide information about useful national and local organisations, statutory and voluntary services, and useful equipment, such as ways of knowing when someone is at the door, or listening to the TV.

Lipreading classes are friendly and informal, allowing people to share problems caused by their deafness and strategies to help overcome these problems.  Many people attending lipreading classes find that their confidence improves and they become less isolated because of their deafness.

Lipreading teachers need to have a mature outlook and a warm, caring and professional approach. They also need to acquire good communication skills so that they can communicate effectively and inclusively with people who have a hearing loss.

You can read more information on out Lipreading Teacher Training Course by clicking here. 


To find out more please contact:

Postal address: The Administrator, Manchester Centre for Deaf Studies, PO Box 319, Manchester, M21 3DG

Telephone: 0161 832 0444   Mobile: 07707 696 539 (SMS or Text only)

Email: enquiries@manchesterdeafstudies.org

The course is based at: Mauldeth House, Mauldeth Road West (entrance on Nell Lane), Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester, M21 7RL

Our websites include:     www.manchesterdeafstudies.org

                                            

 

Keywords

Deaf coping strategies, coping tactics deafness, deaf, hard of hearing, hearing impairment, deaf awareness, overcoming deafness, help for deaf people, coping with deafness, living with deafness, coping with hearing loss, acquired hearing loss

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